The Slightly Confused Woodworker

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B’s & PT’s

It’s been a bit of a while since I’ve blogged about woodworking, but I’ve decided to take a bit of time to let you all know what I’ve been doing.

To quickly sum up, I’ve been using my pointy things to make boxes from bits of wood. The backstory is a bit long and convoluted, so I will save that bit for another post. In any event, it has all been very therapeutic; I sharpen my pointy things, get some bits of pallet wood, clean up those bits, and make boxes out of them. The nice thing is there is very little measuring involved, if the bits of stock are small, I make itty-bitty boxes, if the bits are larger, the boxes are a bit larger. My pointy things don’t care; it’s all wood to them.

I understand that this post is a bit brief, but I had just a short bit of time to compose it. Hopefully my next bit is a bit longer, and explains my new obsession with boxes a bit better. Until then, I’ll keep my pointy things pointy and my bits of wood bitty.

 

The Purge

I am at the point in my woodworking career where I have too many tools. Did I just say that? The guy who has always said to have as many tools as you like as long as you can afford them and store them…Yeah, I did, but it’s not what you think. I have not been woodworking nearly as much as I would like lately. And, the woodworking I have been doing basically requires a block plane, a spokeshave, a saw, a hammer, and a few chisels.

I have very seriously been considering selling off a good portion of my stuff to create some much needed space in my garage. The workbench already has a home if I go through with this (and I have an unassembled one ready to go if and when I ever start seriously woodworking again). The table saw will be a bit harder to move, both on the market as a for sale item, and physically, as it is large and heavy, but first things first. Some of the tools already have local buyers, some I will sell on eBay, and If I may be so bold, some I may just be posting right here on this blog. I hate to solicit people who just happen to be reading my blog, but rest assured most of my tools are of very good quality, and my prices will be more than fair.

Before I go, I just want to stress that I am not ending my woodworking “career”. I will still woodwork, and I will still restore an old tool or two on the rare occasion, and I will still blog about what I am doing But we all know that woodworking takes a lot of time (at least for a person of my skill level).  I’m pretty sure my family feels somewhat abandoned by me (working six days a week and spending what little free time I have engrossed in hobbies will do that to a family), so I have to do whatever it takes to fix that problem.

I had no problem ending my brief return to music this past week. This will be a little more difficult, but it needs to be done. We need the space, I don’t have the time, and I would feel better if those tools were being used by people who will appreciate them and put them to work.

Keep on keepin’ on.

It is very likely that I could fill three or four blog posts with my comings and goings of the past few months. I’m not going to do that at this time. I will mention, briefly, that as far as woodworking is concerned, I’ve been building quite a few different small boxes, some out of “good wood”, some out of pallet wood, and some out of reclaimed stuff. They are all experiments, mind you, but experiments to an end. I have what I feel is an interesting little story detailing a box I am repairing, as well as a box that I soon hope to be building which I will hopefully detail in an upcoming post, sooner rather than later. Otherwise, I’ve also been experimenting with using wood “from the log” and I also hope to write a few posts on that subject as well.

In the meanwhile, I finally got around to reading the Anarchists Design Book. I’m not going to review it because I am not trying to be critical one way or the other. I liked it, and that is enough said. I found myself gravitating more to the boarded furniture/staked stool areas in the book because to me they were the most useful items. Overall, staked furniture is not my thing. I have nothing against it on any level, I just don’t see a fit for it in my house, and I feel it has its limits. When checking out staked furniture on the internet, in particular staked tables, they all looked pretty much the same, and maybe that is the idea in building staked furniture.  I suppose if you are going for an overall theme, such as making a staked living room set, that is fine, but I am one of those people that likes a slightly haphazard look (just a bit mind you) when it comes to the furniture in my house, and that is probably because nearly all of the furniture in my house I built myself, and the pieces I didn’t came mostly from inheritance or antique stores.

One part of the book I did find interesting was the idea that in the past, ornate, high-end furniture was made for the ultra-rich, and that the average person could not come close to affording it.  In essence that was the overall theme of this blog several years ago. I had always found it rather ironic (and I still do) that the actual furniture makers of the 18th and 19th centuries (not the shop owners but the guys doing the construction), the guys that quite a few amateur woodworkers worship today, were working men in every sense of the word, and in reality, they couldn’t even afford to purchase the very furniture they were making with their own hands. There is even a greater irony in that today furniture making, once very much a working-class profession, is now a hobby dominated by the upper-class. There is something to be said there, and if I haven’t before said it, I’m not going to now.

Otherwise, I will keep doing what I am doing. As I mentioned earlier, I’ve been doing a bit of experimenting with working straight from the log. It has led to a lot of understanding when it comes to wedges, mauls, and axe sharpening. And, more fittingly, it led to the restoration and new-found usefulness of a tool discovered in an old shed, given to my by my father in law. But, I will save that story for another day.

Can’t you hear me knocking?

The first woodworking hand tools that I ever purchased new (intended for furniture making..) were from Traditionalwoodworker.com. I ordered a marking gauge, and if I remember correctly, a 1/2 inch chisel and a mallet. I still have those tools and they work as well as the day I first received them. As time passed, I ordered more tools from Traditional Woodworker on occasion and they always seemed to me to be a good company to deal with.

So yesterday evening I went online to order a large auger bit (oddly, not for a woodworking project in the furniture making sense) and one of the places I checked was Traditional Woodworker. Let me correct that, TW was one of the places I attempted to check, because I could not find the web page. I did some more checking and I could not seem to find any indication of the site being changed, or revamped, or simply shut down. Furthermore, I checked some forums and for the time being nobody else seems to have heard anything one way or the other, either.

So I’m writing this brief post just to see if any body has heard any information regarding the whereabouts of the Traditional Woodworker online tool store. My searches have turned up absolutely nothing. I’m hoping that somebody out there who happens to see this post may have heard something and if so, could please let me know what you turned up.

Thanks

Boycott?

***NOTE*** I slightly altered the title of this post to reflect what a commenter pointed out to me…

I try to never interject politics with woodworking. Why in the world would you need to attach a political ideology to the hobby of woodworking? Nonetheless, this post is about politics, so I urge you to please not read it if you would rather be reading about dovetails and tool restoration (I mean this sincerely, not as a half-assed attempt at reverse psychology)

Anyway, if you are following American politics lately, you are likely noticing a lot of division, protests, and in some cases, out right anarchy. As far as protests are concerned, I will only say that they almost never work. They are generally poorly organized and incoherent acts of aggression that ultimately degrade into physical violence and destruction. And almost always protests do little more than further anger their target audience, which is maybe what they set out to do in the first place. If you want to tell me that protests change the world I will disagree and tell you that you are wrong. And if you believe in psychology, which I do, I will tell you to research the psychology of protests/protesters (which is easy to do especially with the internet) and you will read that at their core all public protests violent outbursts that nearly always further alienate the protesters with those who do not agree with them. Even more so, public protests often tend to push people away who may have been “on the fence” when it came to the cause being protested. And the psychological make-up of protesters is even more disturbing, but I’ll leave that to anybody reading this post to research on their own if they care to do so.

Boycotts, however, are something I can get behind. Boycotts are personal, they can make a difference (hurting a company’s bottom line always seems to open up some eyes), and they can be facilitated without breaking windows and physically assaulting old people. There are some companies I have boycotted for a long time, and others more recently. For instance, after some of the events which unfolded last summer, I no longer watch or attend professional sports, and that was something I had done for my entire life.

Boycotts seem to be all the rage right now, but just like freedom of speech, a boycott swings both ways. Less than a week ago I was about to take some of my hard-earned money and purchase a woodworking product when I happened to read something disturbing on the company web page. I am not going to name that company (yet) but I will only say that it was a thinly veiled attack of not only our current President, but far more importantly, our political system. I have had my issues with every single person who has held the office of President (including the current one) since I’ve been old enough to understand how the American political system operates. But I’ve always respected the office and our government. Even more to the point, whoever wrote what they did seems to have very little understanding of how a Republic functions, which really makes me question their intelligence. And I certainly don’t want to give my hard-earned money to stupid people whenever I can help it.

Sadly, another company that I’ve dealt with since I’ve made woodworking my hobby has also used their influence as a forum to push their own political agenda. Once again, what they are doing is perfectly within their rights, but I don’t want to see or hear a political diatribe, subtle or no, when I’m trying to purchase a woodworking item. So from now on both of those companies will no longer see a penny of my business. Attacking a politician is one thing-though it should not be done on a retail company’s webpage IMO-but attacking the American political system and questioning its validity is something I will not tolerate, because I believe our system is still the best option when considering the thousands of years worth of failures of countless other political systems.

You may have noticed that I have not named those companies, and that is because I believe that boycotts are a personal thing, and I am not trying to influence anybody one way or the other. BUT….I wrote this post for a reason. If I do happen to see another woodworking company attempt to use their business to influence the political decisions of their customers, or undermine the American political system in general, I will do anything in my power to encourage others to not purchase their products, and at that I will be naming names. That “power” may not add up to much, but if a bunch of morons blocking traffic and setting fires can supposedly change the world, I’m more than confident that I can as well.

Fixing a hammer.

Generally, when people find out you are a woodworker, or a handyman, or a tradesperson, etc. eventually they start giving you tools. These tools aren’t always related to your hobby or trade, but they usually assume (with good intentions) that you can use them. Sometimes these tools are in good shape, sometimes they aren’t, and sometimes they aren’t even complete. So while continuing my garage clean out I came across four assorted hammer heads (a mason’s/blacksmith’s hammer, a ball peen hammer, and two standard claw hammers) either without handles or with handles that were broken. Like any good tool hoarder, I also happened to have two handles ready to go, though I have no recollection of actually purchasing them. Considering that I already have several ball peen and claw hammers, and considering that one of the replacement handles was a near perfect fit for the blacksmith’s hammer, or mason’s hammer depending on who you ask.  I decided to repair that first.

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The head with the handle removed.

The repair was much simpler than I thought it would be. I first sawed off the remainder of the damaged handle with a hacksaw, then I used a cold chisel to begin pounding out the rest. After a few strikes, I noticed that the prior owner had installed a short lag screw to the top of hammer likely to keep it from wiggling. I used a crescent wrench to remove the lag. Deciding that there was no more metal to be found, I took a 3/8 brad point bit and ran it through the hole that the lag screw left. Two strikes later and the remainder of the wood popped out.

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The wooden wedge installed.

 

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The metal wedge installed.

The replacement handle was a near perfect fit (probably because it was meant for such a hammer in the first place), but I did apply just a touch of paste wax to help it along. Once it was fully seated, I used a 3/4 inch chisel to open up the wedge kerf a bit more, I then pounded in the included wood wedge. Lastly, I seated the metal wedge (which unlike the wooden wedge is installed cross grain ), but rather than hammer it in completely from the top, I flipped the hammer so as not to knock the handle right back out, and used my small anvil to set the wedge. The whole repair took maybe 10 minutes.

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The finished hammer.

The new handle, which is hickory if I didn’t mention it, is the exact length it should be according to the lengths I’ve seen of the hammers that I checked out on line, yet the weight of the hammer feels a bit unbalanced to me. Then again, I’ve never used this type of hammer before, and though I like to consider myself a pretty strong guy, I know that there’s a reason that many blacksmith’s have the forearms of Popeye.

In reality I probably won’t have much use for this hammer other than occasionally. I was just glad to be able to repair it quickly and correctly. The best part of all of this is not my “new” hammer, but the realization of getting the back corner of my garage cleared out for the first time in almost 14 years. I did all of the work in that corner just because I could. I now have full access to my cabinets, a new area for my drill press and grinder, lumber storage, and my sharpening stones are no longer on the floor.

Even better, those of you who read this blog on a somewhat regular basis may recall my having built another woodworking bench that I haven’t assembled yet because of space constraints. I had planned on waiting to reassemble that bench if and when we ever purchase a new house where I can have an actual workshop. And I’ll also freely admit that my current workbench works just fine and has a great deal of sentimental value to me. Well I did some measuring, and with all the new space I may just have enough room for both benches.

Tot Ziens

When you’re a guy like me, and you woodwork at the back of a one-car garage, space is at an ultimate premium. The battle to remove clutter, create storage, and make the work area “work” is never ending. Generally, I keep my work space fairly clean and organized, yet, whenever I am working on a project, I always seem to notice something else that could be improved. And the past weekend was no exception.

This past Friday my daughter wasn’t feeling well, so I took the day off to stay with her. While she slept, rather than continuing my project, I decided to remedy something that has been bothering me for months.

My garage is “L” shaped, and the “L” section usually contains leftover paint, gardening supplies, and countless other items from countless other projects. Many years ago I built a three tier shelf from leftover “two-by” stock and slowly that shelf became more and more cluttered, no matter how-often I cleaned it. Most recently, my Dutch Tool Chest found its way there, and I decided to finally do something about it.

A few years ago Dutch Tool Chests were all the rage. I personally built two, one for my dad and one that I kept for myself. In fact, one of those chests actually made it to the daily top 3 on Lumberjocks. It was a fun project and contained all of my favorite joinery: dovetails, tongue and groove, mortise and tenon, and dados, as well as decorative cut nails. I enjoyed building it immensely.

BUT…

I found that I did not enjoy actually using the chest; it always seemed to be in the way, and once I made wall racks for my woodworking tools, the chest became a storage bin for rags and cleaning supplies, the only tool it contained being the head of an old ball peen hammer that I found. Considering that just a few weeks back I purged my wall cabinets of hundreds of magazines, I had plenty of room for those supplies, and considering the chest takes up a lot of space, I made the decision to put it into my attic and cover it with a sheet.

Even though I spent a lot of time on that chest, the decision to put it into storage was surprisingly easy. Just as I said goodbye to the Moxon vise without any regrets, I am now saying goodbye to the Dutch Tool Chest. I am not impugning either project, as I’ve seen many blog posts describing their virtues; they just didn’t work for me. Both were trends in woodworking that I mistakenly followed without doing enough research, and now both are just side notes in my woodworking history. And though I do regret the money I spent on the hardware for the Moxon vise, I do not regret building the Dutch Tool Chest. As I said, it was fun to build and the construction process made me a better woodworker.

The back corner of my garage is now a little more roomy, and a little better suited for my needs. I even took some of the leftover lumber from the shelf and made a quick little workbench to hold my grinder and drill press, two of the power tools I still actually use on occasion. It is a space I can put to good use. In fact, I hope to turn it into a dedicated sharpening station.

In the meanwhile, I did learn a lesson, and that is to avoid woodworking trends. Maybe there was a reason that items like the Moxon Vice and Dutch Tool Chest disappeared for such a long time. For my part, I found out the hard way that they weren’t for me. But then again, I would never have known if I hadn’t tried in the first place.

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