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For all you new people

I’ve never been to a woodworking tool swap meet. I’d bet that there are quite a few woodworkers who can make the same claim. Unfortunately for me they just aren’t very common in this area. I have been to flea markets and garage sales, and sometimes you can get very lucky and find a few tools at a reasonable price that are in good condition, or in a condition that at the least makes them worth purchasing and saving. But even a more experienced woodworker, one used to owning new or newer tools may not know exactly what to look for, and that, among other reasons, is why I enjoyed The Naked Woodworker DVD.

I purchased the DVD partly out of curiosity, and partly from the recommendation of woodworker Jeff Branch, whose blog I’ve been following for several years. Including shipping, the two discs cost me $27.00, which is less than what I would pay to take my family out to breakfast. The DVD(s) arrived yesterday, and last night I watched the first disc, which focuses on finding used tools worth purchasing and restoring them to working condition, and this morning I watched the second disc, which details the construction of a pair of sawhorses and a woodworking bench. I enjoyed watching both, and I learned more about woodworking because I watched them, which I call a success.

What did I like? Firstly, the host, Mike Siemsen, is a likeable guy; he’s real, he’s a real woodworker, and like all good workers you pick up a few good tips and tricks just by listening to him and watching him work. The discs aren’t overly produced with a lot of annoying music and slick cut scenes, which frankly bug the hell out of me. Secondly, the tool restoration is real, and Siemsen shows real world restoration from old to working tool in real time. It’s quick, painless stuff. For instance, Siemsen shows how to file-sharpen an auger bit. Strangely, I learned how to do that during my electrical courses, and I have a special file that is made just for the task. Siemsen makes mention of the tool, but shows how to sharpen the auger using a basic file that he picked up at the tool swap.

Personally, I was most impressed with the segment on sharpening handsaws. I use just three woodworking saws, and two of them have never been sharpened. It’s not that they don’t need sharpening, but the fact that I am afraid to ruin them in the attempt. Siemsen shows how to joint, sharpen, and re-set an old hand saw using tools he picked up at the swap meet, with plenty of close-up shots that show a lot of detail during the sharpening process. Siemsen demystifies the process and makes it seem much more reachable. For me, it is the clearest instruction on saw sharpening that I’ve ever seen.

Disc two shows the construction of a pair of saw horses and a Nicholson style woodworking bench. Here again, Siemsen shows the entire process and how these essential pieces of shop equipment can be made quickly and effectively. In fact, Siemsen points out that in building the bench and the horses, you also get some good sawing practice in the process, AND, he shows that the joints don’t have to be absolutely perfect, just serviceable. The workbench is particularly impressive, as he builds it with less than $150 in lumber, and without any modifications it is a perfectly good workbench for any style of woodworking. Even more impressive is the manner of construction. Because of the modular nature of the assembly, this bench can be made by an absolute beginner, as well as a seasoned vet, and it could be used by both. Maybe most importantly, the bench can be modified to suit your liking. For instance, the bench is built without vices, which can be expensive. If I were to build the bench (and I just may do that) I would add a leg vice, which can be done for around $50, yet the addition would change the construction process very little. In fact, a leg vice could easily be retrofitted later. This bench is a real workbench, one that could work for a lifetime of woodworking.

These DVDs are marketed towards beginners, and at that they are a great starting off point. But they are also good resources for experienced woodworkers that may just be getting started in hand tools, or an experienced woodworker that is just entering the used tool market, or any woodworker that doesn’t want to spend a few grand building, or purchasing a good woodworking bench. The Naked Woodworker is being offered by Lost Art Press, and there is a link to that site on the resources section of my blog. For under $30 (which includes the cost of shipping-did I mention that?) you get some great tips, and you learn how to truly build up a real woodworking tool kit without breaking your bank account. I, for one, am glad I purchased it.

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